Ending with a Gruff

The older classes in Križ and I managed to finish our Gruffalo project together before the closing of 2012. We watched the entire BBC Animated adventure over a period of several sessions, mixed in with readings from the adorable picture book.

We continued with descriptive worksheets of the forest scenes; Mouse meets Fox; Mouse meets Owl; and Mouse meets Snake. And Mouse’s descriptions of the Gruffalo; his description to Fox; his description to Owl; and his description to Snake.

All of which was interspaced with autumn activities, Gruffalo word games and paper crafts. 🙂

In our final lesson we brought the unit to an end with a dose of reality by looking at which real animals share the Gruffalo’s various features.

We only scratched the surface of what the book has to offer, but thankfully the children are eager to hear all about ‘The Gruffalo’s Child’. 🙂

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The Gruffalo Comes to Križ

I was delighted to discover that the kids at the Križ primary school had yet to discover the gleeful tale of The Gruffalo. So, a new children’s literature project was born.the gruffalo

We started the journey by looking at the story’s incredibly intelligent heroic mouse and watching a part of the beautiful animated adventure.

We then went on to examine the meeting of Mouse and Fox by pinpointing some of the scene’s features and by reliving how Mouse had described the gruesome Gruffalo.

I am really looking forward to our next meeting. 🙂

My Robotic Mission, by Jan, aged 12.

My robot’s name is Armageddon. In this mission he needs to go into the enemy’s base. He needs to take photos and videos, find the enemy’s weak points, and discover how to destroy him.

Armageddon has a missile, an ultrasonic sound ray, two front lasers, and very potent propellers to push away the enemy.

 Armageddon can fly, he can travel off-road, but he can’t go underwater.

He communicates with his base via a satellite connection and he can connect with any computer he finds on the enemy’s base.

Tiny-rannosaurus – Bites Again

This week I am introducing Tiny-rannosaurus to several groups of children.

We are reading a computerized version of the book, and then playing with its themes and images in a mini-project. We are exploring its characters, its locations, and its wonderful chomping, growling, roaring, stamping, charging, slamming vocabulary. And not forgetting, the labelling of  body parts, the learning of a little about the dinosaurs behind the characters and the creating of some great ‘rannosaurus art’.

I hope that it will be enjoyed by all.

A Week of Numbers

Now that Halloween is over, I have decided to bring the children back to reality by looking at numbers. Numbers offer the possibility of dry and boring lessons, but I have attempted to avoid this, as much as possible. 🙂

So while we have been using explanatory worksheets in various forms depending on the class, I have also tried to inject a little active enjoyment with games of Bingo,with or without number restrictions, and by crafting and playing number wheel games and countdown rocketships.

Number learning can, and should, be fun. 🙂

Getting to know a certain red dragon. :-)

As a part of our Halloween book project a number of classes this week are exploring the features of a red dragon which stars in our Halloween book choice.

This little dragon has big yellow eyes and sharp white horns. He has red scaly skin, but his wings are pink and his belly is white.

There are two versions of the worksheet, one for my younger learners, which includes labels for cutting and sticking, and one for slightly older children, which includes a number of ‘mastery questions’.

I hope that somebody else finds them useful.

Halloween Story Time at Križ

‘Story time’ is ‘special time’, so before the class began I transformed a corner of the classroom into a ‘Room on the Broom’ story telling zone by laying blankets on the floor and putting out soft toys of cats and dogs, birds and frogs, and a pair of ferocious Welsh dragons.

Welsh dragons resting safely back at home after an overexposure to excited children.

The children really enjoyed the interplay of the toys and the multimedia book, so we will be certainly repeating similar episodes in the future.

Felix Baumgartner – Clothing and Body Parts Worksheet

“Sometimes you have to get up really high to understand how small you are:”

I have created a quick body and clothing worksheet for some of my young classes. I hope somebody else out there will find it useful.

Felix Baumgartner clothing and body parts .doc

English with Mr Felix ‘supersonic’ Baumgartner :-)

After seeing and cheering Felix Baumgartner‘s incredible supersonic jump on Sunday, and knowing that my young classes would be equally excited, I decided that I would incorporate his flight into a few of  this week’s lessons. 🙂

I started with the first classes yesterday.  Some of the children had already seen the jump and so a foundation of excitement had already been laid.

The first video shown was the jump’s promo video.

After watching it, we froze on Felix’s face and worked on simple ‘face features’ with this worksheet. Then we moved on to drawing Felix’s face in an astronaut’s helmet template.

We finished up this part of the lesson by shooting a video of the kids responding to the question, ‘What’s your name?’. They held up the masks to their faces and answered, ‘My name is Felix.’

During my lessons with other children this week, I will also include some footage of the actual jump .

Along with this great Lego version. 🙂

How are you today?

This week several of the groups and I have had great fun learning /revising answers to this most important question.

The youngest pupils used this worksheet, while the older primary school classes used this one. Then, in a number of the classes we cranked up the fun factor by using these face masks.

Here are a few of the children in the midst of the exercise, please forgive the picture quality. 🙂 (more…)