Christmas with the Snowman

The Snowman

The beautifully animated film ‘The Snowman‘ formed the basis of several groups’ final Christmas and Winter themed lessons. We firstly learnt some warm winter clothing nouns, then we had fun either trying them on or winter dressing a live ‘snowman’.

Winter Clothes

We then watched the film, in full or in part, naming things and animals as we went along. Our next step was to create snowmen for ourselves, so out came our scissors, glue and colours. 🙂

The-Snowman with cake

However, what is a winter without Christmas? So, over the final lessons we played with Christmas words, outlined Santa’s tasks, and sang Christmas songs. And to top it off we created funny old Father Christmases of our very own.

Ending with a Gruff

The older classes in Križ and I managed to finish our Gruffalo project together before the closing of 2012. We watched the entire BBC Animated adventure over a period of several sessions, mixed in with readings from the adorable picture book.

We continued with descriptive worksheets of the forest scenes; Mouse meets Fox; Mouse meets Owl; and Mouse meets Snake. And Mouse’s descriptions of the Gruffalo; his description to Fox; his description to Owl; and his description to Snake.

All of which was interspaced with autumn activities, Gruffalo word games and paper crafts. 🙂

In our final lesson we brought the unit to an end with a dose of reality by looking at which real animals share the Gruffalo’s various features.

We only scratched the surface of what the book has to offer, but thankfully the children are eager to hear all about ‘The Gruffalo’s Child’. 🙂

The Gruffalo Comes to Križ

I was delighted to discover that the kids at the Križ primary school had yet to discover the gleeful tale of The Gruffalo. So, a new children’s literature project was born.the gruffalo

We started the journey by looking at the story’s incredibly intelligent heroic mouse and watching a part of the beautiful animated adventure.

We then went on to examine the meeting of Mouse and Fox by pinpointing some of the scene’s features and by reliving how Mouse had described the gruesome Gruffalo.

I am really looking forward to our next meeting. 🙂

A Wallace and Gromit Inspired Rocket

A Wonderful Space Rocket

Here is a wonder rocket which recently blasted off at Sveti Ivan primary school. Well done, Jil. 🙂

Here is the template which started the creative juices flowing.

My Robotic Mission, by Jan, aged 12.

My robot’s name is Armageddon. In this mission he needs to go into the enemy’s base. He needs to take photos and videos, find the enemy’s weak points, and discover how to destroy him.

Armageddon has a missile, an ultrasonic sound ray, two front lasers, and very potent propellers to push away the enemy.

 Armageddon can fly, he can travel off-road, but he can’t go underwater.

He communicates with his base via a satellite connection and he can connect with any computer he finds on the enemy’s base.

Grand Robotic Mayhem

Following on from Wallace and Gromit‘s meeting with the luna-robot, I thought that we would have some more robotic fun for ourselves.

Barcola primary school was the lesson’s ‘advanced guard’, but my other English groups will not be too far behind. 🙂

We began the session with some youtube enhanced discussions concerning real and make-believe robots. Firstly we looked at a Wall-e short, which the children correctly identified as make-believe.

Then we watched a Honda commercial featuring Asimo.

I explained to them that Asimo was indeed a real robot, but that he needed a squad of technicians on hand to program him even for ‘simple’ tasks. Some of the children seemed relieved to hear this!

After a simple worksheet linking us back to the Wallace and Gromit adventure, we got down to some real fun. So, out came the cardboard boxes, balloons, and Lego for some grand low-tech robotic creations. (more…)

A Grand Project for ‘A Grand Day Out’

Earlier this week some of the children began their first Wallace and Gromit project, based on the duo’s first animated adventure: ‘A Grand Day Out‘.

We started out by watching the film, which all of the children seemed to love, and then we went on to a comprehension exercise. With the youngest classes we completed simple comprehension sentences, while with the slightly older classes answered some comprehension questions.

The remainer of the lesson was spent on either building our own rocket-ships or designing our very own luna-robots.

Tiny-rannosaurus – Bites Again

This week I am introducing Tiny-rannosaurus to several groups of children.

We are reading a computerized version of the book, and then playing with its themes and images in a mini-project. We are exploring its characters, its locations, and its wonderful chomping, growling, roaring, stamping, charging, slamming vocabulary. And not forgetting, the labelling of  body parts, the learning of a little about the dinosaurs behind the characters and the creating of some great ‘rannosaurus art’.

I hope that it will be enjoyed by all.

A Week of Numbers

Now that Halloween is over, I have decided to bring the children back to reality by looking at numbers. Numbers offer the possibility of dry and boring lessons, but I have attempted to avoid this, as much as possible. 🙂

So while we have been using explanatory worksheets in various forms depending on the class, I have also tried to inject a little active enjoyment with games of Bingo,with or without number restrictions, and by crafting and playing number wheel games and countdown rocketships.

Number learning can, and should, be fun. 🙂

A Colourful Witch

Here is a witch and her black cauldron. Her skin is pink and her long hair is ginger. She is wearing a tall black hat and short black boots. Her black cloak has a yellow and green cloak pin. Her shirt is red, and under her purple skirt she is wearing grey tights.

This is yet another activity from the current Halloween project. It is fun to see that as the 31st of October draws nearer and nearer the kids are getting more and more excited. 🙂

This exercise works on the children’s knowledge of colours and clothing,  with older pupils mastery questions, using both the present simple and present continuous, are also used.