Robotic Christmas

The final Sveti Ivan primary school project of 2012 was a two week project concerning robots.

We began our first session with a look at the distinction between real and make-believe robots by watching some wall-e shorts and the Honda Asimo commercial. Then we started working with some humanoid robotic worksheets to learn the names of humanoid body parts. We began by looking at the head, then we continued to the basic body nouns, and  finished off with naming our main movable joints.

At the end of our first session we got funky, and got up from our chairs to dance robotic Gangnam style. It was fantastic.

The second session of the project was also ‘Christmas week’, so we had a robotic Christmas session. I first attempted to amaze the young learners with a look at icub.

It worked! 🙂 So, as a class we took the opportunity to translate the video’s key verbs into Italian and Slovenian.

We next looked at some Christmas vocabulary with the help of some internet generated worksheets and then got robotically funky again with Electronic Santa Claus.

The kids loved that one! We finished up the lesson with a little creativity, as the children drew their own Electronic Santas. 🙂

A Wallace and Gromit Inspired Rocket

A Wonderful Space Rocket

Here is a wonder rocket which recently blasted off at Sveti Ivan primary school. Well done, Jil. 🙂

Here is the template which started the creative juices flowing.

My Robotic Mission, by Jan, aged 12.

My robot’s name is Armageddon. In this mission he needs to go into the enemy’s base. He needs to take photos and videos, find the enemy’s weak points, and discover how to destroy him.

Armageddon has a missile, an ultrasonic sound ray, two front lasers, and very potent propellers to push away the enemy.

 Armageddon can fly, he can travel off-road, but he can’t go underwater.

He communicates with his base via a satellite connection and he can connect with any computer he finds on the enemy’s base.

Grand Robotic Mayhem

Following on from Wallace and Gromit‘s meeting with the luna-robot, I thought that we would have some more robotic fun for ourselves.

Barcola primary school was the lesson’s ‘advanced guard’, but my other English groups will not be too far behind. 🙂

We began the session with some youtube enhanced discussions concerning real and make-believe robots. Firstly we looked at a Wall-e short, which the children correctly identified as make-believe.

Then we watched a Honda commercial featuring Asimo.

I explained to them that Asimo was indeed a real robot, but that he needed a squad of technicians on hand to program him even for ‘simple’ tasks. Some of the children seemed relieved to hear this!

After a simple worksheet linking us back to the Wallace and Gromit adventure, we got down to some real fun. So, out came the cardboard boxes, balloons, and Lego for some grand low-tech robotic creations. (more…)

Brain by Numbers

 

Published in: on 10 November, 2012 at 7:35 am  Leave a Comment  
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Felix Baumgartner – Clothing and Body Parts Worksheet

“Sometimes you have to get up really high to understand how small you are:”

I have created a quick body and clothing worksheet for some of my young classes. I hope somebody else out there will find it useful.

Felix Baumgartner clothing and body parts .doc

English with Mr Felix ‘supersonic’ Baumgartner :-)

After seeing and cheering Felix Baumgartner‘s incredible supersonic jump on Sunday, and knowing that my young classes would be equally excited, I decided that I would incorporate his flight into a few of  this week’s lessons. 🙂

I started with the first classes yesterday.  Some of the children had already seen the jump and so a foundation of excitement had already been laid.

The first video shown was the jump’s promo video.

After watching it, we froze on Felix’s face and worked on simple ‘face features’ with this worksheet. Then we moved on to drawing Felix’s face in an astronaut’s helmet template.

We finished up this part of the lesson by shooting a video of the kids responding to the question, ‘What’s your name?’. They held up the masks to their faces and answered, ‘My name is Felix.’

During my lessons with other children this week, I will also include some footage of the actual jump .

Along with this great Lego version. 🙂